Tag: encountering God

Letter 15: Truth is a Person

My Son,

 

Truth isn’t just some abstract concept, or a list of facts, or a black and white picture. Truth is a person, and a person is full of emotion, feeling, passion, intellect, will, flesh and blood, spirit and life. A person is like a diamond, and like a diamond, truth is multifaceted. From one angle or perspective, a person can look a certain way, but from another, that person can look totally different. So I ask, is truth relative or absolute?

Well, no matter which angle you choose to look at the diamond, the diamond is still the singular and absolute object you are observing. It would be absurd to assert that from one angle this object is a diamond, while someone else asserts it is actually an elephant. It is what it is in the absolute sense. To say, however, that this diamond is only a true diamond from the angle you are looking at it, is also absurd. The beauty one person sees may not be the same beauty someone else sees. There is relativity at play in the viewing of the diamond. Thus, truth is both relative and absolute, and most certainly found in the person of Jesus Christ.

During Christ’s Passion, the dialogue between Jesus and Pilate revolves around truth: “Pilate said to him, ‘So you are a king?’ Jesus answered, ‘You say that I am a king. For this reason I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice.’ Pilate said to him, ‘What is truth?’” (John 18:37-38). The scene just ends abruptly with Pilate’s question to Jesus just hanging in the air. What did Jesus say? What was his response? I can imagine Jesus simply locking eyes with Pilate, and Pilate suddenly realizing he is looking at Truth himself.

You can look at John’s portrayal of this scene through this lens because the night before at the Last Supper Jesus had told his disciples, “I am the way, and the truth, and the life; no one comes to the Father, but by me” (John 14:6). So, the answer to Pilate’s question, “What is truth?” is Jesus himself. Words cannot adequately describe this Word of the Father. So instead of answering Pilate’s question with words, Jesus answers through his profound silence and being.

Let Jesus gaze upon you, my son. His eyes of Truth will pierce your heart and humble you. Truth is a person, and this person is worthy of your affection, obedience, and worship.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 14: Jesus Portrayed in “The Lord of the Rings”

My Son,

 

You probably know this already, but my favorite movies of all time are The Lord of the Rings movies. I also love the books, but since I saw the first movie before reading the books, the movies remain my first love. What is great about J.R.R. Tolkien is that there are so many deeply Christian themes throughout the story that he did not necessarily plan when he began to write the books. Tolkien was a strong Catholic, and his faith is evident in his writing, albeit perhaps unintentionally.

There are many Catholic themes in The Lord of the Rings: Frodo and Sam are sustained on their journey by the Elvish waybread (lembas bread) which corresponds to the Holy Eucharist that sustains Christians; Galadriel, or the Lady of Light, gives the Fellowship gifts to equip them on their journey and she is a clear portrayal of Our Lady, Mother Mary, who with the Holy Spirit, gives us gifts; the ring represents sin and evil in the world with Sauron, or Satan, being the spirit behind it all. There is a myriad of other themes and lessons from The Lord of the Rings, but I especially want to draw your attention to how Jesus is portrayed in the story.

There are three primary characteristics of Jesus that are vividly portrayed in The Lord of the Rings: Jesus as the Priest and Suffering Servant, represented by Frodo; Jesus as the Prophet, represented by Gandalf; and Jesus as the King, represented by Aragorn. Each of these characters experiences some sort of death and resurrection contributing to the salvation of Middle Earth. Frodo bears the burden of the ring, representing sin, for Middle Earth by carrying it to the fires of Mordor. He experiences a type of death after the ring finally melts in the lava, and a type of resurrection when the eagles rescue him and bring him to be restored in Gondor. Frodo expresses the priestly ministry of Jesus in offering himself as a sacrifice for the salvation of the world (unlike Jesus, Frodo tries to keep the ring for himself at the end. Frodo also represents our journey through this life and the temptations we face). Gandalf doesn’t just represent the prophetic ministry of Jesus, but comes to signify the Son of God coming in power at the world’s end. Gandalf the Grey dies when he falls into the abyss in Moria and fights the Balrog, but in his resurrection he comes back as Gandalf the White (a more powerful and authoritative class of wizard) and “comes again” just in the knick of time during the battle of Helm’s Deep to defeat Saruman’s army. Aragorn is the humble king who starts out as a mere Ranger from the north, but comes into his own after passing through the realm of the dead (corresponding to Jesus going to the realm of the dead in 1 Peter 3:19). He then rises from the place of the dead to defeat the enemy and claim his rightful place as King of Gondor. Frodo, Gandalf, and Aragorn are all types of Christ in their own respective roles as Priest, Prophet, and King.

Hopefully next time you read or watch The Lord of the Rings your eyes will be open to seeing Christ in the different characters. Many more things could be said about the Christian themes and lessons found in The Lord of the Rings, but I will leave those for you to discover in time.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 13: Movies & the Gospel

 

My Son,

 

The Gospel can be seen nearly everywhere if your eyes are looking for it. Watching movies is one of my favorite ways to see the Gospel. I especially enjoy it when the movie does not intend to communicate the Gospel, but it’s clear nonetheless. One example would be in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hollows pt. 2 where Harry literally offers to sacrifice himself so that his friends would be saved. He subsequently rises from the dead and conquers his enemy. Another example would be the movie Elysium, where Matt Damon can choose to save himself or sacrifice himself so that the poor people on earth can have healthcare. He ends up choosing to die so that others may live. There is quite a bit of bad language in that movie, so I highly doubt the screenwriters and director intended to communicate the Gospel to their viewers, but the Gospel was even more explicit than the language. I just love flipping the secular culture’s intentions against itself.

The truth of the matter is that every good story has the Gospel at its center. Love expressed through sacrifice is at the heart of the Gospel. It is this sacrificial love that our human hearts are drawn to and made for. Not even our secular culture can deny this reality of love that is so vital to the human identity. For these reasons, the Gospel can be seen even in the least likely of places. If the story is truly good, then you will truly see the Gospel: “For the fruit of light is found in all that is good and right and true” (Ephesians 5:9).

Before watching your next movie, pray that God would allow you to get a fresh revelation of the Gospel through the movie. If you can’t pray that prayer because you’re ashamed that the movie you’re watching is too dirty, then you probably should not watch that movie. Yet even in movies you would not expect to see the Gospel, you should ask God to show it to you and then look for it. If the movie is truly good, you will see Jesus in it. Seek the Gospel and you will find the Gospel.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 12: What Is the Gospel?

 

My Son,

 

When you hear the word “Gospel,” what do you think of? The term “Gospel” is often used in Christian circles, but many people don’t even understand what that word means (I know I didn’t know for the longest time). It seems that leaders often take it for granted that everyone properly understands that term. For starters, the word “Gospel” comes from the Greek word “Evangelion,” which means “Good News.” In Christianity, the term Gospel is associated with the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Indeed, the Gospel is the Good News of Jesus Christ.

So, what exactly is this Good News of Jesus Christ? Some people like to boil down the Gospel into a short phrase, and that can be useful at times (I will share some of my favorite summaries in a bit), but the Good News is much more. In fact, the Good News has been most explicitly recorded into four books of Sacred Scripture: the Gospel according to Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. The entirety of Christ’s life and saving work on the cross is the Gospel we share. Sharing a teaching of Jesus is sharing the Gospel. Sharing about Jesus’ healing ministry is sharing the Gospel. Sharing about the kingdom of God is sharing the Gospel. Sharing about Jesus Christ’s birth, hidden life, public life, teachings, death, burial, resurrection, ascension, reign, and second coming are all aspects of the Gospel that we, as Christians, proclaim. As you can see, the Gospel is centered on Jesus Christ, and the central part of Christ’s mission is found in his Passover, or Paschal mystery, where he became the lamb that was slain and raised from the dead to give us life. “The Paschal mystery of Christ’s cross and Resurrection stands at the center of the Good News that the apostles, and the Church following them, are to proclaim to the world” (CCC, 571).

The Gospel is about Jesus and the Gospel is for us. “The Gospel is the revelation in Jesus Christ of God’s mercy to sinners” (CCC, 1846). As St. Paul tells St. Timothy, “Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners” (1 Timothy 1:13). Jesus himself says, “I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance” (Luke 5:32). Sinners are found in every nation and people group, and Jesus came for all of them. The Gospel is for everyone. We are to proclaim the Gospel to the whole world because Jesus died for all of humanity, Jews and Gentiles.

This is the great mystery of the Gospel that St. Paul writes about in his letters; “And the Scripture, foreseeing that God would justify the Gentiles by faith, preached the gospel beforehand to Abraham, saying, ‘In you shall all the nations be blessed.’ So then those who are men of faith are blessed with Abraham who had faith…that in Christ the blessing of Abraham might come upon the Gentiles, that we might receive the promise of the Spirit through faith… There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus. And if you are Christ’s, then you are Abraham’s offspring, heirs according to promise” (Galatians 3:8-9,14, 28-29). “The Gentiles are fellow heirs, members of the same body, and partakers of the promise in Christ Jesus through the gospel” (Ephesians 3:6). “For God has consigned all men to disobedience, that he may have mercy upon all” (Romans 11:32). Through his Church, the Body of Christ, God is creating a new humanity, so that he may once again be united with his children. The Church is universal, or catholic, and therefore encompasses all people groups, age groups, income levels, genders, and any other category of humanity. The goal of this new humanity is to be caught up in the life, love, and holiness of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. “The ultimate end of the whole divine economy is the entry of God’s creatures into the perfect unity of the Blessed Trinity” (CCC, 260). This is Good News!

There are many ways to summarize the Gospel message without compromising its content or diminishing its impact. Perhaps the most popular verse in Scripture used to summarize the Gospel is found in the Gospel of John, “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. For God sent the Son into the world, not to condemn the world, but that the world might be saved through him” (John 3:16-17). The Good News is that God has sent his Son. “‘But when the time had fully come, God sent forth his Son, born of a woman, born under the law, to redeem those who were under the law, so that we might receive adoption as sons.’ This is ‘the Gospel of Jesus Christ, the Son of God’: God has visited his people. He has fulfilled the promise he made to Abraham and his descendants. He acted far beyond all expectation – he has sent his own ‘beloved Son’” (CCC, 422). Why did God send his Son? God loves us and wanted to save us from the tyranny of sin and death so that we may have eternal life. “And this is eternal life, that they know thee the only God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent” (John 17:3).

The very first paragraph of the Catechism of the Catholic Church is a beautiful summary of the Good News of Jesus Christ: “God, infinitely perfect and blessed in himself, in a plan of sheer goodness freely created man to make him share in his own blessed life. For this reason, at every time and in every place, God draws close to man. He calls man to seek him, to know him, to love him with all his strength. He calls together all men, scattered and divided by sin, into the unity of his family, the Church. To accomplish this, when the fullness of time had come, God sent his Son as Redeemer and Savior. In his Son and through him, he invites men to become, in the Holy Spirit, his adopted children and thus heirs of his blessed life” (CCC, 1).

From the very start of the Church, summaries of faith have been used to communicate the Gospel and unite the people into the one faith of Jesus Christ. One such Creed from the early Church Tradition is the Apostles’ Creed. If someone asks you to articulate the Gospel, you can respond with this Creed, saying, “I believe in God, the Father Almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, his only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended into hell. On the third day he rose again. He ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. He will come again to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen” (Apostles Creed, CCC p. 56-57).

My hope is that you are now more confident to articulate the Gospel so that you can go and share it with others. Summarizing the Gospel can be a useful tool, but remember to point your listeners to the original Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John). It is in these Gospels that we can read about the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus. Yet the Good News isn’t merely to be read, but experienced and obeyed. The Good News of Jesus is that we are adopted children of God and incorporated into his Body, the Church. It is through the Church that the Paschal mystery is re-presented at Mass for us to experience. It is through each of the Sacraments of the Church that we participate in the Gospel. Through Baptism, we die with Christ and are raised up to walk in the newness of his life. Through Confirmation, we are strengthened in the Holy Spirit to proclaim the Gospel. Through the Holy Eucharist, we partake in the Body and Blood of Christ so that his sacrifice nourishes and sustains us. Through the Anointing of the Sick, people can unite their sufferings with the sufferings of Christ, and even experience the healing ministry of Christ. Through the Sacrament of Reconciliation, the forgiveness purchased for us by Christ can be applied to our lives. Through Holy Orders, the priest becomes the representative of Christ the Good Shepherd to the flock. Through Holy Matrimony, the husband and wife become a living picture of Christ’s love for his Church. All of these Sacraments are instruments for experiencing the Gospel.

May you grow to proclaim the Good News of Jesus Christ with boldness, and experience this Good News through his Church. God loves you.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 11: Unlocking the Imagination

My Son,

 

One of the more fun elements of hearing God’s voice that I have experienced comes from unlocking my imagination. When I was in college I went on a trip to Central Asia and my companion prayed for me. As he prayed, I could see in my mind’s eye the heavenly Father holding my hand and walking me around my college campus back home. In that simple picture, the Lord revealed his tender fatherly care for me. Ever since that moment, my imagination has run wild with images of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit with me at different times. Sometimes I visualize Jesus hugging me, jogging with me, smiling at me, and speaking to me. Sometimes I see him as a shepherd gently leading me to streams of living water. This unlocking of the imagination seems childish, I admit, but aren’t we called to have childlike faith? Aren’t we supposed to be experiencing God in part even now? Aren’t we supposed to set our minds on things above?

The imagination is a gift from God; why not use it to connect with him? However, we must be careful not to manipulate our imagination to conjure up a picture of God created after our image, but rather to visualize what he is like as revealed in Scripture and his Church. Having a sanctified imagination will help you abide in Christ in every moment of the day. It will help you to fulfill the call of Philippians 4:8, which says, “whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excellence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.” Picturing the Father smiling down upon you, or Jesus wrapping his loving arms around you, or the Holy Spirit drenching you with his peace, are all images that are true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, gracious, excellent, and worthy of praise. Let this be your filter when thinking about God and your mind will be guided in the right direction.

May your imagination be unlocked in such a way that your awareness of God’s presence is heightened and enriched in every moment of your life.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 10: Hearing God’s Voice: Beautiful & Dangerous

 

My Son,

 

Hearing God’s voice can be both beautiful and dangerous. This topic has caused me more trouble than most. I’ve been part of groups that say the Christian journey is all about “hearing” God’s voice, and then doing what he says. That sounds good and even biblical, but also raises some questions. What do people mean when they say they “heard” God’s voice? Is this an audible voice? A voice inside their head? A thought or feeling they have that seems random? What is this “hearing” people speak of?

To some, hearing God’s voice almost always means a thought or feeling they had internally. To others, hearing his voice is limited to the pages of Scripture. I say yes to both ways, and there’s still more. I never want to put limits on how God can speak and act, so he can do whatever he pleases. Throughout my life, I have “heard” God’s voice in Scripture, prayer, Mass, sermons, the Catechism, music, movies, books, culture, camp, nature, other people, practical thoughts, imagination, dreams, internal feelings and random thoughts. God is through all and in all, and “in him we live and move and have our being” (Acts 17:28), so this list could go on and on.

Even though God can speak through just about anything, a word of caution is in order. Let Scripture be your first source for deciphering whether or not you are truly hearing God’s voice. Let the Holy Spirit, working through the Church, guide your interpretation of Scripture and your ability to hear God’s voice. If the Holy Spirit can speak to you directly, then surely, he has spoken to the saints who have gone before us. If God is telling you something completely unique that is not rooted in either Scripture or the Tradition of the Church, then you ought to be very careful before you claim it as God’s voice. Many false prophets have arisen because they thought they heard God’s voice. This is why we must take into account what he has already spoken to his Church throughout the ages. When you’re submitted to Scripture and the authority of the Church, then you are in a safe place to hear God’s voice. Remember, son, it’s not just about you and Jesus in a personal relationship, but about you as part of the Body of Christ in a communal relationship with Jesus. It’s personal and communal. Therefore, hearing God’s voice is both personal and communal.

I was once so obsessed with constantly hearing God’s voice that I would ask him whether I should drink orange juice or water with my breakfast. Oh how I tried my hardest to hear his voice in my head before making this monumental decision. Looking back, it seems quite ridiculous. I knew I was in trouble when I was trying to read the Bible one time and got distracted by this same “voice” inside my head which I had thought was God. This “voice” had become more of a slave-driver than a Shepherd. If you go down the road of trying to hear God’s voice in your head, then please let your knowledge of God and of his nature as revealed through Scripture and the Church overwhelm your thoughts. If what you hear is commanding or demanding, then it probably is not your heavenly Father. If this “voice” causes you anxiety and makes you feel guilty for not obeying the “voice,” then it’s probably the accuser you are listening to. I’ve experienced and known others to experience much anxiety over the “voice” inside their heads, thinking that it was God.

Now that you’ve just seen how dangerous this topic was to me, you can also see why the Sheepfold (i.e. The Church) and Scripture are so important for our safety. It truly is a beautiful thing when you stay tuned to God’s voice, because your relationship with him can grow so deep and so constant through it all. Just be sure that it really is God’s voice you’re listening to. Remember, “the wisdom from above is first pure, then peaceable, gentle, open to reason, full of mercy and good fruits, without uncertainty or insincerity” (James 3:17).

What I think would be most helpful for you, my son, would be to focus — not on hearing God’s voice internally — but on the voice he has already spoken in Scripture and through his Church, and then follow that. His command is to love him with all that you have, and to love your neighbor as yourself. So do that. He wants you to feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, and take care of the least of these. So do that. He wants you to know how much he loves you. Reflect on that. Reflect on the Gospel.

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 9: Charisms of the Spirit

 

My Son,

 

My life really started getting exciting when God introduced me to some of the charisms, or gifts, of the Holy Spirit. It was in college when I first heard someone speaking in tongues. I was invited to a prayer meeting with a couple of girls and a friend of mine to pray that God would visit our campus in a special way. In that room, the presence of God was so “thick” that I was on the floor laughing and feeling a flood of peace wash over me. As I was on the floor, I started to hear someone praying in a language I thought may have been French. One of the girls, who did not know French, was praying in some unknown language. That same prayer group introduced me to the gifts of prophecy and healing as well. We started seeing prophetic words realized and people physically healed on our campus. It was an incredible time. The charisms of the Holy Spirit are so fun!

The Apostle Paul writes about the gifts of the Spirit when he says, “To each is given the manifestation of the Spirit for the common good. To one is given through the Spirit the utterance of wisdom, and to another the utterance of knowledge according to the same Spirit, to another faith by the same Spirit, to another gifts of healing by the one Spirit, to another the working of miracles, to another prophecy, to another the ability to distinguish between spirits, to another various kinds of tongues, to another the interpretation of tongues. All these are inspired by one and the same Spirit, who apportions to each one individually as he wills” (1 Corinthians 12:7-11). This is not an exhaustive list (because Paul gives another list in Romans), but it still gives us a good idea of what kinds of gifts the Spirit gives.

I never have really understood why some people don’t believe that the gifts are still for today and reject the gifts altogether. If God wants to give me a gift, who am I to reject such generosity? They are gifts, and gifts ought always to be received with joy. I also think it’s interesting that in a lot of charismatic circles the first two gifts that Paul lists seem to be ignored. Wisdom and knowledge are true gifts of the Spirit and are to be equally cherished alongside the more “flashy” gifts like healing. God does not want us to check our minds at the door when it comes to experiencing the Holy Spirit. Being self-controlled is a fruit of the Spirit that must be exercised, along with the other fruits of the Spirit, when people say they are “manifesting” or being heavily influenced by the Spirit. The ultimate manifestation of the Spirit is not in these gifts, but in a fruit-filled life of love. This is why Paul follows his description of the gifts of the Spirit by going back to the source of it all by saying, “If I speak in the tongues of men and of angels, but have not love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal. And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but have not love, I am nothing. If I give away all I have, and if I deliver my body to be burned, but have not love, I gain nothing… So faith, hope, and love abide, these three; but the greatest of these is love” (1 Corinthians 13:1-3, 13). Beware of those who claim to have “gifts” or “powers” of the Spirit but who are not humble or loving. Follow the fruit. Utilizing the charisms should be out of love and for the sake of love.

When you start experiencing more and more of the gifts of the Spirit enjoy the ride, because it is a wild adventure. Use discernment, value every person’s gifts, and have fun!

 

Love,

Dad

Letter 8: The Craziest Thing I’ve Seen God Do

My Son,

 

When I was in my early twenties I went on a trip with a group of friends to Eastern Europe. During that trip, I met an interesting young woman. It was a Sunday and I was feeling tired, so I went to the hotel lobby to get a Nescafe when I saw this young woman talking to the owner. Her name was Sarah and she asked me where I was from and then I asked her the same question. She told me she was from Jerusalem and I got oddly excited about this fact. I was so full of energy, I immediately asked her a question concerning the spiritual atmosphere in Jerusalem. She told me that the spiritual climate mainly consisted of Muslims, Atheists, some Jews, and barely any Christians. She proceeded to tell me she was Atheist, but really more of a universalistic, New-Age type (culturally Jewish, of course). She had just finished her undergraduate degree in photo-art and was in Eastern Europe to display her exhibit on intimate family (which is funny because our group called itself a spiritual family).

As we continued to talk, I shared with her some intriguing revelations from the Old Testament I had just learned the day before from one of my friends on the trip. She was so fun to talk to because she had grown up hearing the Old Testament but had no idea that any of it pointed to Jesus. She had also known a few facts about Jesus, but had never heard his story from the New Testament. As our conversation was winding down, my two friends, Melissa and Christine, walked downstairs and start talking with us. I headed out to the evening church service while they sat down and continued chatting. Melissa then played a song her husband wrote about God called “Beautiful” and asked Sarah what she felt during the song. Sarah could only listen to half the song because she felt truly touched by the Holy Spirit. Christine and Melissa invited Sarah to church that night, but she didn’t come until after it was nearly over. Afterward, we all went out to dinner and the whole group got to meet her. She instantly became part of the family and was astonished at the joy and love that we carried because of Christ. Later that night, I got to share with her more of the Gospel story and she listened receptively.

The following Sunday, we invited Sarah to church for the evening service where we were helping out with worship and preaching and she said she would come. Earlier in the week, a couple of us had decided to pray for Israel with the pastor of the church. As soon as we started praying for Israel, Sarah walked in and sat down. Later in the service, we prayed over Sarah and she said later that she felt like a representative or representation of the nation of Israel. My friend, Mark, led worship and felt God was doing something really specific with it that night. He started singing “Let it Rain” over and over. It was powerful! Then, my friend, Phil, shared his testimony and it seemed to be exactly what Sarah needed to hear based on what she had told some of us (but not Phil) about her past. It was as if the whole thing was set up for her to encounter God.

After the service, we went to dinner and Sarah kept saying she felt like God would send rain, since we prayed and sang to God about it. Now, it had rained maybe once when I first arrived to this country, but other than that, it had been sunny each day. Later that night, a couple of us were talking to Sarah about Jesus outside our hotel under a large awning. As we began to talk we heard a few raindrops overhead. We thought that was strange, but nothing too crazy. We continued talking and the light rain stopped. She asked us about Jesus walking on water and we told her the story from the Gospel of John. She was fascinated by that story, as she had swam in the Sea of Galilee growing up, and then asked about being born again. We read her the Scripture passage from John 3 and she was really intrigued by it. Then, some of the people from our group went upstairs to get ready for bed while Phil and I were left with Sarah. Phil shared a couple more things about his story of encountering Jesus, and then she asked me, “Is there a prayer I need to pray before I get baptized?” I thought about it and said, “Nah.” Immediately after I said that, there was an absolute downpour of rain over us. It was loud and coming down so hard that it went through the awning and started getting all of us wet. Sarah was so excited God had sent her a sign that she went outside the awning to dance in the rain, but much to all of our surprise it wasn’t raining outside the awning. It was literally only raining right over where we were sitting. The fear of God came upon me and I was filled with awe at this dramatic sign sent from God. He was just there, and his mighty hand was on Sarah!

This, my son, was the craziest thing I’ve ever seen God do. I hope this encourages you to expect the miraculous in your life.

 

Love,

Dad